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Watch Garry Winogrand: All Things are Photographable

(261) 7.6 90 min 2018

Garry Winogrand: All Things are Photographable is a movie starring Geoff Dyer, Jeffrey Fraenkel, and Susan Kismaric. A documentary about an important American still photographer who captured New York City in the 1960s (his work...

Starring
Susan Kismaric, Erin O'Toole, Jeffrey Fraenkel, Geoff Dyer
Genres
Documentary
Director
Sasha Waters Freyer

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Product details

Audio English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles 日本語  Čeština  Português  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Genres Documentary
Director Sasha Waters Freyer
Stars Susan Kismaric, Erin O'Toole, Jeffrey Fraenkel, Geoff Dyer
Country USA
Runtime 1H 30M
Description A documentary about an important American still photographer who captured New York City in the 1960s (his work there is said to have influenced the TV show Mad Men) and later the West in Texas and Los Angeles.

Top reviews

Friday, 03 Jul 2020 12:47

As the title of this documentary suggests, the subject matter is all about the world of film. Not the art, but the medium itself, and how it has influenced the lives of so many people. As a fan of film, I am not surprised by the documentary's title. It is about all of us, from the viewer to the filmmaker, and how we can all learn from each other. The film covers a lot of ground, with interviews with actors, directors, and even writers. They have been interviewed by various people in the industry. The results are not very encouraging, with many of the interviews sounding like the same old story. They seem to be just passing along what they have heard. And, if that is the case, then we all need to pay more attention to what we hear. The documentary covers many different subjects, but I found the interviews with actors to be the most interesting. They are the ones who have had the greatest impact on the world, and they are often the ones who have the most to offer. They are often the ones who have made their mark on the world, and they are the ones who will make the biggest impact in the future. It was also interesting to hear the people who have been most affected by the medium. For example, they talked about how it has affected their children, or how it has affected their marriages. It was very interesting to hear how many of the people interviewed are now deceased. I also liked the way they covered the impact that the film industry has had on society, as well as the impact it has had on individuals. The film was well done, but not very informative. I would have liked to have seen more of the interviews, but it was still interesting. I would recommend this documentary to anyone interested in film, as it is an excellent way to learn more about it. 7/10
Saturday, 06 Jun 2020 20:53

An artist by the name of Garry Winogrand has become a household name in the United States, and rightfully so. He's the founder and sole owner of the prestigious New York City gallery, The Goldblatt Art Museum. He's also the primary artist at the New York Public Library. The director of the museum, Mary Shor, is also a prominent figure in New York City. And as is the case with many great artists, Winogrand has had his fair share of brushes with the law. I think the title of this documentary is misleading. It is not a documentary about his art, but more about his personal life. We follow him through a variety of events, including a failed assassination attempt, a public scuffle with a homeless man, and a meeting with the police that turned into a gun battle. He is able to maintain a calm demeanor throughout, despite his reputation as a violent artist. The events in his life are important, and the amount of time he spent with them is great. He is able to show us the good and bad in his life, and even some of his personal problems, including an alcoholic father and a teenage daughter who is very talented. The documentary is not a documentary about his art, but more about his life and his personal problems. There are many personal interviews that go into his life, but he is not able to talk much about his art. We are able to learn about the life of the artist, but we are not able to hear the artist talk about his art. That said, the documentary is still good, and it does have some good footage. The most important part of the documentary is the interviews with the police officers. It was interesting to hear their stories, but I am not sure how they are able to tell the stories so well. I'm not sure if it is the director's fault, or if it is because of the actors, but it seems that there were many occasions where they were either unable or unwilling to speak to the camera. However, the interviews with the police officers are good, and I think they are the most important part of the documentary. The documentary is a good documentary, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes to learn more about Garry Winogrand. I do not think it is a great documentary, but it is a good documentary. I give it a B.


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